Meet MSK Kids Pediatric Neuro-Oncologist Matthias Karajannis

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Matthias Karajannis is the Chief of the Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Service at MSK. Learn about his expertise in caring for children and young adults with brain and spinal cord tumors.

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DR. MATTHIAS KARAJANNIS

Hello.

Hello.

Hi. Good to see you.

Doctor!

My aim is to reassure families that they’ve come to the best possible place, and that our team will work relentlessly to ensure the best possible outcome.

My name is Matthias Karajannis. I'm the Chief of the Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering. My mother was an anesthesiologist, and she inspired me to enter the medical field. And during my training, I really became attached to pediatrics.

This one’s a little harder, right? Can you do faster? Very good!

I have over 20 years of experience in the comprehensive treatment of children and young adults with brain and spinal cord tumors.

My personal experience lies within chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapy, and immunotherapy. Beyond that, we're fortunate to be working with a world-class team of experts in neurosurgery and radiation oncology, and many other specialists, all of which are motivated to optimize care for our patients.

We have very close interactions day-to-day in the clinic, but we also have weekly team meetings where we discuss and review treatment plans for all of our patients together.

When patients and families come to us, they're scared about what the future might bring. Every family is different, and I try to listen to their top concerns when facing a new diagnosis. We will make every effort to arrive at the most precise diagnosis and develop a tailored treatment plan that is suited to each individual patient and each individual family's needs.

MSK is at the forefront of discovery in pediatric neuro-oncology research.

Our field has experienced tremendous progress over the last decades. There have been major advances in our ability to accurately diagnose brain tumors because of advances in molecular diagnostics.

The kid’s doing fantastic, really.

What I love most about being a pediatric neuro-oncologist is we learn from our patients every day in so many ways, and it makes us better doctors.